October 13, 2017

Movies || Friday the 13th: My 13 Favourite Horror Films from the '90s

Since it's Friday the 13th in Halloween month, I thought I'd share my 13 favourite horror films of the 1990s. Why the '90s you ask? Well, those were my formative years - prepubescent and teen - and these films were among those that established some of my favourite things, horror films being one of them, along with vampires, aliens, werewolves, and science-fiction.

Horror films from the nineties get a lot of criticism, with many saying it was the worst decade for horror, especially coming off of the work that 1980s horror films did that really broke some boundaries for what horror movies could do, what subjects they could handle, and how far they could push the proverbial envelope. On the back of films the likes of A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Thing, The Evil Dead, Poltergeist, Hellraiser, Childs Play, and Friday the 13th - all classics of the genre - the nineties films had the opportunity to delve into practically every fear and temptation imaginable, but very rarely broke the boundaries set by their predecessors, often sticking to tired formulas, jumping into legions of sequels, and losing focus. It is possible some of them tried too hard: just think of Buffy the Vampire Slayer (which is unashamedly on my list, by the way), which had an excellent idea but attempted to fit a lot of background and lore into a poorly-paced film, or the poor executions of what should have been memorable send-offs for Freddy Krueger, Pinhead and Jason Voorhees after years of scaring and entertaining but ended up nothing more than damp squibs.

Regardless of its failings, nineties horrors opened up a door for me, coming out of the world of animation and Saturday morning cartoons to appreciate the cinematography and writing of films that made a lasting impression on me, regardless of whether they've made it into the horror canon or not.

Here's my list:

13. Mimic

mimic-posterWhile Mimic is certainly not the best example of a science-fiction horror, considering the likes of Alien and The Fly, it was really the atmosphere and directing that I enjoyed. Guillermo del Toro's signature visual sense adds to the gravitas of the creature that has been created. Mira Sorvino was also for a time one of my favourite actresses and I enjoyed her in a role that didn't depend on her attractiveness. The film has an amazing atmosphere and the creature effects are also excellent. Besides, who wouldn't be freaked out by giant cockroaches that can mimic humans, their prey?
Image credit: Mimic: Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

12. Ravenous

raveous-posterI was super disturbed after watching Ravenous for the first time. I remember I was watching it all alone as the rest of my family slept. It's really quite a chilling concept, considering how cannibalism is such a taboo subject. If you're looking for a bona fide cannibal movie that is thrilling and scary with a hint of supernatural, this one-of-a-kind film is it. I haven't watched it in years and I can still hear the bone-chilling repetitive soundtrack.
Image credit: Ravenous: Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

11. Scream

scream-poster
Scream is a classic for me. I was in high school and I had gone with a group of friends, and we yelled at every jump-scare. This makes it a nostalgic film for me, because of the atmosphere in which I watched it: a dark cinema with the flock-mind of all of us together. I loved that it parodied the concept of a plotline for a horror movie, making us question what we were watching and relishing the twists and turns that come with guessing who the murderer is. For me, Scream was really a whodunnit along with a horror film - compare it to Halloween or Friday the 13th where we know who the killer is - we just don't know where he is until it's nearly too late.
Image credit: Scream: Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

10. The Faculty

the-faculty-posterIn another merging of my favourite genres, The Faculty is science-fiction-cum-horror-cum-teen angst film. In a manner similar to that of Scream, it parodies the science-fiction monster film while being a pretty good thriller as well. If you haven't seen it before, I bet you can guess who the bad guy is pretty quickly. But that is part of the pleasure: "Ha! I was right!" you'll say. Possibly to yourself as you're watching it alone late at night. .
Image credit: The Faculty, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use


9. Idle Hands

idle-hands-poster
For me, Idle Hands was the first comedy-horror I really enjoyed. For me it was such a witty concept that someone's hand can literally become possessed as a result of sloth. Throw in freakin' Seth Green and Elden Henson as zombies and it was perfect. Not great, but lots of fun. At least back then. It's been panned as being universally unfunny but it has a cult status among us. By us I mean, nineties horror lovers. Some of them.
Image credit: Idle Hands, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use


8. Deep Blue Sea

deep blue seaAs a creature feature, Deep Blue Sea, for me, hasn't been topped by many shark films (proof: Sharknado; counterproof: The Shallows). However, it was a completely believable concept and it was only inevitable that the shark experiments would bite back. Literally. Cue the rooms with plenty of dark, still water, human limbs making their way through said water, and scary-as-hell giant sharks with blood on the brain and you have a genuinely thrilling (and bloody) film to watch.
Image credit: Deep Blue Sea, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

7. Alien: Resurrection

alien-resurrection-posterSad to admit, but it's true: Alien: Resurrection was the first Alien film that I remember seeing, since I was technically not old enough to watch the originals. However, it did make me go back and watch the original trilogy, which is possibly my favourite ever. It was panned by critics though for not being visually stunning and for following the basic tenets of the first film, obviously with the hope of making it as much of a success. On the other hand, bringing Ripley back as a clone of both herself and the alien Queen made for an intriguing concept, reflected in the way in which the cast views Ripley throughout: is she friend or foe?
Alien: Resurrection, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

6. Seven

seven-posterI remember Seven being quite a gamechanger with regards to the melding of horror and crime suspense. Not only did it have a stellar cast, but its story was entirely unique and utterly brutal. The dark subject matter comes only second to the ending itself, which is gut-wrenching and makes you question your own dark side. John Doe is possibly one of the scariest villains ever.
Image credit: Seven, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use


5. From Dusk Till Dawn

from-dusk-till-dawnIn a classy yet violent take on the vampire genre, Quentin Tarantino won my heart with his foray into the bloodsuckers with From Dusk Till Dawn. It's a film that I watched over and over through the years and it is still entertainingly clever. It's gritty heroes made way for the antihero in mainstream film, while its extended action scenes are an early, better, version of those we are bombarded with in modern action films such as the modern Transformers series. Hey, at least FDTD has a plot, y'all!
Image credit: From Dusk Till Dawn, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

4. Wolf

wolf-posterWerewolves are a surprisingly neglected concept in the world of horrors. But if I had to choose between An American Werewolf in Paris (which I enjoyed) and Jack Nicholson as a werewolf, it would definitely be the latter. Wolf is unique in that it does not indulge the horror lover's desire for gore and blood and ripped throats so much as it tempts them to look at what makes them return to animalistic mannerisms. Of course, as werewolves always are, it's about untapped sexual power and domination.
Image credit: Wolf, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

3. Copycat

copycat-posterTrue, Copycat is not a horror in the true sense of the word, but the horror is more psychological than it is bloody. This is a film that I really enjoy watching, no matter how many times I do so. It is tightly woven, the pacing is excellent, the villain is creepy, and the concept is spine-tingling. After all, isn't it terrifying to know someone has been watching you and thinking of doing terrible things to you? Plus, it stars Sigourney Weaver and some really outdated tech. Bring it on!
Image credit: Copycat, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

2. Buffy the Vampire Slayer

buff-the-vampire-slayer-posterI can hear you groaning and asking why Buffy the Vampire Slayer is number two on my list. Let me explain: it's sentimental. I watched it over and over again with my sister and then came a time in my life when I felt everything stopped being perfect: much like Buffy did herself. Head cheerleader, popular girl at school, great boyfriend, independence... and then along came her destiny. Though I cannot claim to ever have had a life similar to Buffy's, the film echoes on a deeper level as Buffy depends on her womanhood to survive - something every teen girl is yet to understand. It may be camp and the acting may be meh, but at its heart it wants every woman to be able to take her destiny in hand and fight off the challenges she may face.
Image credit: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

1. Bram Stoker's Dracula

bram-stokers-dracula-posterProbably known for Keanu Reeves' worst acting stint ever, Bram Stoker's Dracula is at the top of my list because really I'm just a romantic at heart. Defying God and becoming immortal gives Dracula the chance to wait for his true love to return and he does anything for her. Throw in some sexy vampire scenes, blood, people eating cockroaches, and truly amazing production design, and you have the ideal basis for a film that will remove Dracula from a century of being nothing but a villain to becoming someone who has a heart and love deeper than anything many of us will ever know.
Image credit: Bram Stoker's Dracula, Wikimedia Commons, Fair Use

What do you think of my list? Are there any of my favourites you also enjoy? What are your favourites from the nineties?

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