November 3, 2017

Book Review || The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green happened to be sitting on the recent returns shelf at the library and I thought, 'Why not?' The novel is highly acclaimed and a New York Times Bestseller, and a film was made from it, so it must be good.

And that it certainly is, to a point. I laughed (well, sort of inwardly giggled with a smirk on my face), I cried. The characters have been given such tough luck in life that it is difficult not to like their immense optimism, especially Augustus Waters', and the strength it must take for them to make it through every day of pain. I liked that Hazel Grace tried so hard to be a silent sufferer. I liked that Isaac was more heartbroken at losing who he thought was the love of his life than his eyesight. I always enjoy the depth of character that comes from reading a novel instead of watching the film, so in this case I enjoyed the book much more than I did the film. In fact, I did more crying reading Hazel's innermost, private thoughts than I did watching an erstwhile depressed and downbeaten teen fall in love and suddenly have only happy feelings for her future.

That being said, something feels off to me in the way these teens speak to each other. Perhaps it is their nearness to Death that brings out their poetic genius and their witticisms, for I honestly don't remember being so pretentious as a teenager. Then again, as a teenager I never did do a lot of socialising or talking. I will have to ask my remaining friends if they ever felt this way about me, before someone calls me a liar. :) On the other hand, there is something endearingly childish about these teenagers - perhaps they are simply living their lives and having their say because they of all people know how short life is.

The Fault in Our Stars is actually a mirror of Peter van Houten's An Imperial Affliction (a made-up author and a made-up book). While Van Houten's novel literally ends in the middle of a sentence, these teens' lives could similarly end as quickly. Augustus' diagnosis shows that and the depth of Hazel and Augustus' sudden and deep love for each other may not be a fault in anyone's stars but just two people reaching out for true recognition in a world where everyone feels sorry for you on Facebook but don't really know who you are.

The message I took from the novel was that, obviously, life is short - whether or not you have cancer - and living what you have is infinitely better than living hoping for more all the time. Of course, one should also value your family and show them - something I'll have to work on this year.



Have you read the book or seen the film? Let me know what you think in the comments section!

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